Child Support FAQs

Disclaimer: Each child support matter is unique as each person’s financial status is different.  These are designed to answer general questions.  For specific information, please consult our attorneys at Vinsko & Associates, P.C.  These answers do not constitute legal advice.

How is Child Support Calculated?

There are specific calculations set forth in the Pennsylvania Rules of Civil Procedure that are based on several factors, including, but not limited to: your income, the other parent’s income, and the number of children involved.

Who Makes the Determination of How Much I Owe or I can Receive?

These calculations are handled through the county domestic relations office.  A conference officer will obtain your income and the other parent’s income, review tax returns, various bills and other information, and calculate the amount due under the circumstances. 

Does the Length of Time a Parent Has Custody of The Children Affect the Amount of Support?

It can.  If the custody arrangement is 50/50, there can be a potential reduction in the amount owed to the receiving party.  To review your particular situation, call Vinsko & Associates, P.C.

What Happens If I Disagree with the Child Support Amount?

After a conference officer makes a determination, you have 20 days to appeal to a Support Master if you disagree with the recommendation. If you do not appeal, the recommendation will be adopted as an order of court.

What If I Have Been Covering Expenses, Rather Than Making Direct Payments?

In many situations, payments on behalf of the child may be considered support payments.  These are evaluated on a case-by-case basis.  Call us to see if your situation applies.

How Long Do I Have to Pay Child Support?

Pennsylvania law requires both parents to support their children financially until they are 18 years of age, or until they complete high school, whichever is later.  This is the general rule, as certain exceptions or modifications may apply, such as situations where there are children who have physical and/or emotional challenges.

What Happens If One Party Has A Change In Circumstances (New Job)?

You can file a Petition for Modification if circumstances require a change in support, wither it be an increase or decrease.  A promotion or a job loss are examples of such a change. It is important to note that if a petition for modification is filed, the domestic relations office can take into account all issues and your support can go up or down.  That is why it is important to consult a lawyer for child support before filing or a modification.

For any other Child Support questions, please reach out to any Vinsko & Associates P.C. office and speak to our family law attorneys.  You can contact us by phone or by email, or through our Contact Page.

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